Difference between revisions of "3rd Party IPC Integration"

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==Integrated PoE==
 
==Integrated PoE==
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[[File: 3pi switch settings.JPG|150px|thumb|right|Switch Settings]]
 
The built-in PoE switch works with 3rd party cameras but just like before, configuring the cameras prior to connection is detrimental. Decide before setting up the cameras if the cameras will use the NVR‘s IP scheme or if the NVR will use the camera‘s IP scheme. By default, the NVR‘s internal switch is set to 10.1.1.1. Either set the cameras to match the 10.1.1.x network scheme or change the NVR‘s internal switch to match the camera’s network scheme. If the cameras already have static IP addresses, it may be faster to change the internal switch to match the camera‘s network. Access the switch settings through the head end or web interface by navigating to Network then Switch. Changing the switch IP will cause the NVR to reboot. After completing these steps, connect the cameras to the PoE switch. Click manual add and set the following:
 
The built-in PoE switch works with 3rd party cameras but just like before, configuring the cameras prior to connection is detrimental. Decide before setting up the cameras if the cameras will use the NVR‘s IP scheme or if the NVR will use the camera‘s IP scheme. By default, the NVR‘s internal switch is set to 10.1.1.1. Either set the cameras to match the 10.1.1.x network scheme or change the NVR‘s internal switch to match the camera’s network scheme. If the cameras already have static IP addresses, it may be faster to change the internal switch to match the camera‘s network. Access the switch settings through the head end or web interface by navigating to Network then Switch. Changing the switch IP will cause the NVR to reboot. After completing these steps, connect the cameras to the PoE switch. Click manual add and set the following:
  

Revision as of 21:39, 17 January 2019

The majority of modern IP cameras are Onvif S compliant which means that 3rd party cameras should work with an IC Realtime or Clearview recorder. Check the manufacturer’s documentation for Onvif support before attempting to integrate a 3rd party camera with our systems. The cameras will not be plug-and-play like an IC Realtime or Clearview camera would be; they will have to be pre-configured. Assign static IP addresses to the cameras whether they are being connected directly to the NVR or connected to the network. It is important to keep in mind that Onvif will strip down proprietary features, e.g. built-in analytics or error reporting.

Pre-Installation

As mentioned before, it is imperative to verify Onvif support before continuing with the installation. Check the camera’s documentation before proceeding. Some manufacturers require enabling Onvif within the camera interface. For example, Axis cameras and Hikvision cameras require creating a specific Onvif user. The NVR will use this profile to establish a connection with the camera. Firmware plays a heavy roll in 3rd party integration so update all cameras before installing.

On the Network

The cameras need static IP addresses before enrolling them to the NVR as NVR will not update the IP address if the DHCP lease changes. Complete the pre-installation steps then log into the NVR either via the web interface or the head end interface. Navigate to the camera registration page and select manual add. The built-in device search feature may be inconsistent so manual enrollment is the preferred method. Set the following:

Onvif Manual Add
  • Manufacturer: Onvif
  • RTSP Port: RTSP port of camera *usually 554
  • HTTP Port: HTTP port of camera *usually 80
  • Username: Username to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif username
  • Password: Password to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif password
  • Server Type: Auto/Schedule
    • If the camera doesn’t connect, change to UDP


Onvif works in the majority of cases but rarely it will not connect. Use RTSP in place of Onvif if the cameras won’t establish a connection. Manufacturer documentation will, usually, contain the proper RTSP syntax. If the manufacturer's manual does not contain the RTSP string, they can usually be found by using iSpyDirect or Onvif Device Manager. The end of this document has links to these resources. Set the following:

RTSP Manual Add
  • Manufacturer: Customized
  • Main Stream: Main stream rtsp string
    • IC Realtime's RTSP as an example -- rtsp://192.168.1.108/cam/realmonitor?channel=1&subtype=0
  • Sub Stream: Sub stream rtsp string
    • IC Realtime's RTSP as an example -- rtsp://192.168.1.108/cam/realmonitor?channel=1&subtype=1
  • HTTP Port: HTTP port of camera *usually 80
  • Username: Username to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be crated, use the Onvif username
  • Password: Password to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif password
  • Server Type: Auto/Schedule
    • If the camera doesn’t connect, change to UDP

Integrated PoE

Switch Settings

The built-in PoE switch works with 3rd party cameras but just like before, configuring the cameras prior to connection is detrimental. Decide before setting up the cameras if the cameras will use the NVR‘s IP scheme or if the NVR will use the camera‘s IP scheme. By default, the NVR‘s internal switch is set to 10.1.1.1. Either set the cameras to match the 10.1.1.x network scheme or change the NVR‘s internal switch to match the camera’s network scheme. If the cameras already have static IP addresses, it may be faster to change the internal switch to match the camera‘s network. Access the switch settings through the head end or web interface by navigating to Network then Switch. Changing the switch IP will cause the NVR to reboot. After completing these steps, connect the cameras to the PoE switch. Click manual add and set the following:


  • Manufacturer: Onvif
  • RTSP Port: RTSP port of camera *usually 554
  • HTTP Port: HTTP port of camera *usually 80
  • Username: Username to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif username
  • Password: Password to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif password
  • Server Type: Auto/Schedule
    • If the camera doesn’t connect, change to UDP'


Similar to connecting over the network, Onvif may fail to connect. Use RTSP in place of Onvif if the cameras won’t establish a connection. Manufacturer documentation will, usually, contain the proper RTSP syntax. If the manufacturer's manual does not contain the RTSP string, they can usually be found by using iSpyDirect or Onvif Device Manager. The end of this document has links to these resources. Set the following:


  • Manufacturer: Customized
  • Main Stream: Main stream rtsp string
    • IC Realtime's RTSP as an example -- rtsp://192.168.1.108/cam/realmonitor?channel=1&subtype=0
  • Sub Stream: Sub stream rtsp string
    • IC Realtime's RTSP as an example -- rtsp://192.168.1.108/cam/realmonitor?channel=1&subtype=1
  • HTTP Port: HTTP port of camera *usually 80
  • Username: Username to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be crated, use the Onvif username
  • Password: Password to log into camera
    • If an Onvif profile had to be created, use the Onvif password
  • Server Type: Auto/Schedule
    • If the camera doesn’t connect, change to UDP


Resources

The manufacturer’s documentation is always the best resource to use though occasionally this may not be feasible. 3rd party resources provide assistance in discovering proper RTSP strings. Two in particular are iSpyConnect and Onvif Device Manager. iSpyConnect keeps a large database of cameras and their RTSP strings while Onvif Device Manager can be used to discover them. Keep in mind that both of these resources are not managed by IC Realtime.

iSpyConnect - https://www.ispyconnect.com/sources.aspx

Onvif Device Manager - https://sourceforge.net/projects/onvifdm/